Bringing It

Dear friends, 

We’re not sure if it seems this way to you, but trying to absorb all the advice and resources about COVID-19 and higher ed is starting to feel like drinking from a firehose. Not to mention all the hours on Zoom and all the guides about teaching online. Frankly we are in awe of the heroic speed, energy, and nimbleness with which faculty and staff have responded to the emergency through remote teaching and student support. This should put the lie once and for all to the canard about higher ed’s inability to adapt creatively.

Dear friends,

While all of us shelter in place, trying to stem or slow the pandemic, it’s more important than ever that we stay connected to and supportive of each other. The BTtoP staff are scattered right now in North Carolina (Caitlin), Oklahoma (Mercedes), New Hampshire (Kate), and Michigan (David). But we are one in the hope that you are safe and healthy. And we want to stay connected with you as you navigate the educational needs of the emergency we’re all facing.

Dear friends,

This issue of Bringing It features two reflections. Our friend Jessica Lax at Ashoka U describes the ideas that are guiding the important work she and her colleagues are beginning on climate change education. And David reflects on the fact college presidents are issuing a spate of important new books on the future of higher education.

What Our Partners Are Doing: Educating Students on Climate Change

Dear friends, 

We are excited by your responses to recent issues of Bringing It. We’ve heard strong agreement with Brian Murphy’s post (published in last week’s number), which asked, “How does higher education play a positive role [in confronting climate change]?” Here Gray Kochhar-Lindgren of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) shares his university's efforts:

Dear friends, 

We’d like to start this week’s Bringing It off with a pressing reflection by our friend Brian Murphy, President Emeritus of De Anza College. We recently invited you to muse on the opportunities and challenges facing higher ed throughout the next decade. This is what Brian had to say:

Dear friends, 

Last week we invited you to reflect on the questions below: 

·      What are the key strengths that higher education carries into the 2020s?

·      What are the key weaknesses of higher ed as we enter the 2020s?

·      What new opportunities for positive change will the coming decade bring?

·      What new threats to our work and our values does the coming decide pose? 

Dear friends, 

Happy New Year! We hope you had a restful and festive holiday with family and friends alike. 

First, some good news. When we started our bi-weekly Bringing It emails back in September 2018, we had around 2,500 community members on our listserv. We are thrilled to announce that we now have nearly 4,000 readers!  Around 27 percent of you are faculty, 25 percent administration, 28 percent student affairs, 10 percent organizational partners (think nonprofits), and 10 percent students.  

Dear friends, 

In our last Bringing It of 2019, we wanted to thank you for the joy you have brought us as thought partners and collaborators. This time of year serves as an opportunity to reflect on the successes, challenges, and relationships of the last year. We’d love to hear your reflections on 2019 and the “twenty-tens,” especially in relation to the good work you all do in higher education. Shoot us a line at info@bttop.org. We’d love to have your thoughts take us into the new decade. 

Dear friends,

We wanted to take the time to offer you some thoughtful reflections, impactful resources, and reminders. Enjoy!

Reflections: “Young, Gifted, @Risk, & Resilient” National Conference

Pages