Frequently Asked Questions

The information below can be found in materials from across our website, largely in the Multi-Institutional Innovation Grants Request for Proposals available on our Funding Opportunities Page at http://www.bttop.org/grants-funding/funding-opportunities, but has been compiled here for your convenience. If you cannot find the answer you are looking for on this page or in the RFP, please feel free to reach us with questions at info@bttop.org and we will reply as soon as possible.

Funding is currently available through the RFP for Multi-Institutional Innovation Grants of up to $7,000. The deadline for proposals is February 4, 2019. For more information on Multi-Institutional Innovation Grants and to see the full RFP with instructions for submitting a proposal, visit our Funding Opportunities Page: http://www.bttop.org/grants-funding/funding-opportunities.

Although the timeframe for grant-supported activities and expenditures can be somewhat flexible depending on the project, we expect the work supported by Multi-Institutional Innovation Grants to be pursued and completed between May, 2019 and September, 2020.

Proposals for Multi-Institutional Innovation Grants are due by February 4, 2019. All proposals should be submitted electronically as Word or PDF attachments emailed to info@bttop.org.

We offer some examples of potential topics in detail beginning on page 2 of the RFP, which can be accessed through our main Funding Opportunities page: http://www.bttop.org/grants-funding/funding-opportunities.

These examples are not meant to be prescriptive - we welcome and encourage your creative ideas and approaches. 

Multi-Institutional Innovation Grants are open to non-profit colleges and universities from all academic sectors. Associations and consortia are eligible to apply, but not for the support of their normal, ongoing collaborative activities. Proposed projects must include at least two partnering institutions, but larger partnerships are encouraged. We especially welcome proposals that bring together institutions from different academic sectors or with diverse educational missions. 

There are no formal limits to the number of proposals of any kind that can be submitted by an institution (concurrently or otherwise).

Proposals must be submitted by February 4, 2019. Proposals should be submitted electronically as Word or PDF attachments emailed to info@bttop.org.

Awards will be announced via an email to the principal investigator by mid-March 2019. For more information on how to submit a proposal, see the full RFP available from our funding opportunities page: https://www.bttop.org/grants-funding/funding-opportunities.

Proposals should be approximately no longer than ten pages - including the information sheet, budget, letters of endorsement, and biographical/organizational materials. However, if your proposal is slightly over this limit that is fine as well. The ten page limit serves to save our reviewers from having to read multiple lengthy proposals. While we also do ask that your proposal include certain pieces of information, which can be found on page 3 of the RFP (available from our Funding Opportunities page), overall we are much more interested in your creative ideas and the content of the proposals than the way they are formatted.

Associations and consortia are eligible to apply, but not for the support of their normal, ongoing collaborative activities.  

 

A "PI" is the grant Principal Investigator. This person is most responsible for and involved in your proposed project and will be the main person with whom BTtoP communicates. Proposals should include the PI’s name, job title, and contact information. Please note that notes of award will be sent to the individual listed as the PI.

There are no formatting requirements for your proposal, such as font size, spacing, type, or margins. 

While we also do ask that your proposal include certain pieces of information, which can be found on page 3 of the RFP (available from our Funding Opportunities page), overall we are much more interested in your creative ideas and the content of the proposals than the way they are formatted.

Awards for the Multi-Institutional Innovation RFP will be announced by mid-March, 2019.

Yes. We suggest taking a look at our collection of Bringing It notes sent to our community on a bi-weekly basis. Reading these materials is not required - they are simply meant to be resources for potential grantees if they are interested. 

Your budget narrative should be unique to your own proposal, and particular line items are not required or expected. Examples of types of budgetary items seen in previously awarded grants include (but are not limited to): space rental, travel costs, marketing and communications, consultation fees, food/refreshments, materials/supplies, books, certificates of participation, AV needs, and honoraria.

Appropriate budget items include both direct and indirect costs - we just ask that indirect costs be identified and estimated as closely as possible. There is no percentage requirement for direct or indirect costs.

 

All grants require a 1:1 matching commitment from the partner institutions. Up to half of the match may come in the form of in-kind resources, but at least half is required to be a financial commitment to the project budget. Because we expect--and hope--that many proposals will involve partners with unequal resources, the matching contributions (both monetary and in-kind) may be shared unequally by the participating institutions or fully borne by one partner. The proposal budget should clearly describe the source of matching contributions. 

In-kind matching is composed of non-cash contributions of time, equipment, space, and other items committed to the goals of the project. In-kind matching may involve the use of items already owned by the applicant or the use of items or personnel donated by a third party (e.g. volunteer labor). The match amount should be documented and verifiable from an applicant’s records.

Cash is an expense that will be directly incurred by the proposed initiative. For example, a salaried faculty member spending a portion of his/her time, for which s/he is paid, on a project is considered cash. (If the faculty member is not paid for their time, rather they are donating their time, this is considered in-kind.) Equipment purchased specifically for an initiative may be included in the cash match, whereas equipment already owned may not. Cash need not be from an external source.

The PI's of Multi-Institutional Innovation Grants will be expected to document their project in three ways:

  • a grant report to the Bringing Theory to Practice staff (and, depending on the length and timeline of the project, an interim report)
  • a formal, final budget report (and where relevant an interim budget report) to the Bringing Theory to Practice staff 
  • public-facing materials that accessibly present the project, its outcomes, and its significance for wider consumption. Depending on the nature of the project, these materials might take the form of reports, curricula, research papers, or media and digital resources 

Unfortunately, due to limited staff resources, BTtoP can not offer recommendations by request regarding potential or declined proposals. In special cases, in its letter of response to a proposal, BTtoP may choose to provide recommendations regarding a proposal that has merit and is compatible with BTtoP's mission but is not yet fundable. Those seeking to understand the interests of BTtoP and our pattern of funding are encouraged to review the Awarded Grants section of our website.

No. Membership in any organization is not required of applicants.